Category Archives: Police conduct (good and bad)

Militarized Police

The militarization of police scares the hell out of me.

How about you?

This from the NY Times: Get the Military Off of Main Street.

98-year-old woman seeks to overturn 1950 spying conviction

Hysteria often breeds wrongful convictions. The anti-communist hysteria of the 1950s McCarthy era undoubtedly led to some miscarriages of justice, and Miriam Moskowitz says her espionage conviction was one of them. Now 98, Moskowitz says she wants to clear her name while she still has time, and has asked a federal judge to throw out her 1950 conviction. You can read about the case here.

Monday’s Quick Clicks…

Dredging the Prosecutorial Muck in Orange County

From the OC Weekly:

Superior Court Judge Thomas M. Goethals, is set to issue an Aug. 4 ruling about whether prosecutors in the Orange County (CA) district attorney’s office (OCDA) and local law enforcement, including OCSD (Orange County Sheriff’s Department) deputies, cheated in hopes of securing the death penalty for Scott Dekraai, the shooter in the 2011 Seal Beach salon massacre — and, if so, what penalties should be imposed.

This is subsequent to a three-justice panel at the California Court of Appeals based in Santa Ana observing that jail deputies at the Orange County Sheriff’s Department (OCSD) “engaged in abhorrent conduct and were derelict in their duties.”  That is:  committing perjury; doctoring logs; unnecessarily firing weapons at inmates sitting on toilets; ignoring medical emergencies; bolstering the power of incarcerated organized-crime bosses; encouraging inmate-on-inmate violence; and spending work hours running private businesses, sleeping, surfing the Internet, watching TV or texting love interests.

Read the OC Weekly story here.

Robbery, Kidnapping, Extortion — and This Is the Police!

What can I say?

See the Philadelphia Inquirer story here.

Tuesday’s Quick Clicks…

Crime Fiction: Did the Chicago police coerce witnesses into pinpointing the wrong man for murder?

From The New Yorker:

BY 

At around two-thirty in the afternoon on May 8, 1993, Marshall Morgan left his mother’s house, on the South Side of Chicago, and drove off in her light-blue Chevrolet Cavalier. Morgan was borrowing the car and, in return, had agreed to get it washed. It was a warm day, and he wore denim shorts, a black-and-white pin-striped shirt, and black sneakers. After he got the car cleaned, he planned to return home and spruce himself up: he had a date with his girlfriend that night.

Morgan was a twenty-year-old sophomore at the Illinois Institute of Technology, where he played point guard on the basketball team. The season had just ended, and he had performed notably well, averaging eighteen points and three steals a game; he had been the runner-up for the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference’s most-valuable-player award. His coach, Ed McQuillan, told me recently that Morgan was a “great kid” and a complete player, who was “quicker than hell, great on defense—he could shoot long, and he could drive and penetrate.”

Continue reading…..