In Netherlands, New Evidence Shows Innocence in Hilversum Showbiz Murder case

Submitted by the Knoops Innocence Project, Professor dr. G.G.J. Knoops, lead counsel, Carry Knoops-Hamburger, co-counsel, Lizette Vosman, co-counsel, Trix Vahl, paralegal:

On Tuesday July 8, 2014, the defense team of Martien Hunnik, as well as the attorney general of the Supreme Court of the Netherlands, filed a request for review of his criminal case. Hunnik has been convicted in 1984 for second degree murder on Bart van der Laar, a then famous music producer, in 1981 in Hilversum. Both requests are based on the results of a new criminal investigation into the case, which was initiated after the Knoops’ Innocence Project had filed a request thereto on March 19, 2013. The Knoops’ Innocence Project has been investigating the case of Mr. Hunnik since 2011.

On the basis of Article 461 of the Dutch Code of Criminal Procedure the defense may request the attorney general to conduct further research into a case, if there are indications that a novum exists. A criminal case can be reopened in the Netherlands on the basis of a novum, which is a new “finding” that was not known to the judge, and this finding must be of such a nature, that if the judge was aware thereof, it would have most likely resulted in a different verdict. Thus, under the new Article 461 of the Dutch Code of Criminal Procedure, which is operative since October 1, 2012, the defense may request for further research if there are indications that a novum exists, which may eventually lead to a request for review on the basis of a novum and consequently to the reopening of a criminal case.

The defense request for further research of March 19, 2013, was based on several indications that demonstrated that Mr. Hunnik could not have committed the crime in 1981. The Board of Procurators General, the highest authority in the Dutch Public Prosecution Service, supported this defense request with its own request for further investigation, because the Board also doubted the guilt of Mr. Hunnik.

Under the leadership of Attorney General D.J.C. Aben of the Supreme Court of the Netherlands, a new criminal investigation has been conducted from September 2013 till May 2014. As part of this investigation, many witnesses were heard and new tactical-technical research has been conducted. This led the Public Prosecutor to believe that Mr. Hunnik could not have committed the crime, but that others have done so.

On July 2, 2014, the results of the new criminal investigation have been revealed to the defense and Mr. Hunnik, which led the defense to submit a request for review to the Supreme Court of the Netherlands.

The request for review is based on three nova, which imply that Mr. Hunnik would not have been convicted if the judge was aware of these nova. Particularly the fact that a scenario arose with a different perpetrators, while excluding Mr. Hunnik as the perpetrator, was decisive. This scenario was already known to the Public Prosecutor in 2004, but only revealed to Mr. Hunnik and his defense team in 2012, when the Knoops’ Innocence Project was investigating the case.

Mr. Hunnik was very relieved when he was informed of the results of the new investigation, and the fact that also the Attorney General petitioned to reopen his case. Mr. Hunnik has been fighting for justice for over 30 years. He recanted his initial (false!) confession of January 18, 1983 already in April 1983; yet, the judges did not accept this. He has maintained his innocence since then. Unfortunately, he was not believed by the judges and was convicted primarily on the basisof his false confession. The new criminal investigation into the case demonstrated that virtually all elements of his confession, were already publicly known due to outlets in the media.

This request for review is unique, not only because it is the oldest review case in the Netherlands (33 years), but also because the new investigation case identified other perpetrators; yet, the court no longer has jurisdiction over the crime, due to the Statute of Limitations (since 1999).

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