Category Archives: Compensation/Exoneree compensation

Annual Exonerations Report: A record number of years lost by those exonerated in 2018

A record 1,639 years were lost in prison by those wrongly convicted and exonerated in 2018, according to “Exonerations in 2018,” the annual report of The National Registry of Exonerations (NRE). The 151 persons exonerated in 2018 spent an average of 10.9 years wrongly incarcerated before exoneration. The report highlights milestones, trends, and the year’s specific exoneration takeaways.

For example, in September 2018 the total number of years lost by exonerees exceeded the milestone of 20,000. As of today, that number is 21,095 lost years for the 2,418 persons known to have been exonerated since 1989.

One highlight of 2018 was an extraordinary 31 defendants exonerated as a result of the scandal in Chicago stemming from an era of police corruption led by Sergeant Ronald Watts in which defendants were framed by police on drug and weapons charges. Reinvestigation of these cases — 30 of which were drug crimes — prompted the exonerations.

The Registry notes contributors to wrongful conviction in each case of exoneration. The 31 Chicago cases were included in at least 107 cases involving official misconduct, a Continue reading

Wrongfully Convicted; “Beatrice Six” Awarded $28.1 million

“Six people were convicted of a murder they didn’t even remember. Now a county owes them $28 million.”

Six people convicted of brutally raping and killing an elderly woman,  but none of them had any memory of the crime . . . because they were innocent.

And if that’s not bad enough, here’s the really scary part – the police actually convinced three of them that they were guilty!

See the story from the Washington Post:  https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2019/03/06/six-people-were-convicted-murder-they-didnt-even-remember-now-county-owes-them-million/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.51ac6b22a0a1

 

NRE’s Newest Report: Years Lost, Human and Other Resources Squandered

The National Registry of Exonerations’ latest report reveals a staggering 20,080 years lost behind bars since 1989 by victims of wrongful conviction and, in an accompanying report, $2.2 billion in compensation paid to exonerees by governments, even though more than half of exonerees have never been compensated.  Radley Balko of The Washington Post provides this informative preview opinion of the soon-to-be-released report. Thanks to the National Registry of Exonerations for revealing indisputable data that continues to be a blaring, heartbreaking call for criminal justice reform.

 

 

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Getting guilty police/ prosecutors to pay compensation to victims of wrongful conviction?

20170504150130-2Vietnam: in a recent wrongful conviction case, where a man spent 18 years in prison for a murder he did not commit (along with many of his relatives), a large compensation package has been agreed. Interestingly however, this compensation is to be paid after a ‘compensator’ agrees who was responsible for the miscarriage of justice, and how much each they must then contribute to the compensation sum.  So potentially, the police and prosecutors involved in the case will have to pay – from their own pockets – towards the compensation. Some details are to be found here…

Staff liable for compensation payouts in miscarriage of justice it states that: The Ministry of Finance has just proposed that the People’s Supreme Court ask those involved in the miscarriage of justice that saw Huynh Van Nen convicted to pay out compensation for their wrongdoings.

The police, courts and prosecutors have all apologised for their role, but it seems that this will be insufficient – they will also now have to pay compensation. One wonders if such a measure may act as a powerful deterrent for those in a position to prevent/ overturn wrongful convictions in the future. Alternatively of course, it could ensure that those that have been involved in wrongful convictions have an even more powerful motivation to ensure it is never uncovered. For many victims of wrongful conviction, one of their greatest complaints is that those who were involved in the injustice are never held to account. There are few apologies, and certainly fewer disciplinary measures taken – nevermind prosecutions. Vietnam is perhaps taking a radical approach to punishing those involved. How the ‘compensator’ apportions blame , or even tries to determine how to apportion blame, would be most interesting to know.

 

Thursday’s Quick Clicks…

Weekend Quick Clicks

  • Newspaper articles focuses on cost to taxpayers of “shoddy” and “reckless” police work that led to a wrongful conviction.   That’s the kind of coverage the public needs to see more of–the cost of wrongful conviction to their own pocketbooks, because the cost to the public is high in a variety of ways.
  • One year after release, Keith Harward travels country to point out failures of forensic science, help the wrongly convicted
  • New exoneree compensation law in Michigan provides $50k for each year behind bars

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