Irish Innocence Project Confirms Pardon

From the Irish Times:

Almost 75 years after Harry Gleeson was hanged for murder, Minister Frances Fitzgerald has officially announced the Government’s decision to grant a posthumous pardon.

The Government has determined the conviction was unsafe and will advise the President to exercise his right of pardon under Article 13.6 of the Constitution.

In February 1941, Mr Gleeson was convicted of murdering mother of seven Mary McCarthy, who died of gunshot wounds to the face.

He had found her body lying in a field on his uncle’s farm in New Inn, Co Tipperary the year before.

He was sentenced to death and was executed in Mountjoy Prison in April 1941.

The Attorney General directed an independent review of the case after a submission from the Irish Innocence Project and the Justice for Harry Gleeson Group.

Barrister Shane Murphy SC, who reviewed the case, concluded there were deficiencies in the conviction rendering it unsafe. In his opinion, the conviction was based on unconvincing circumstantial evidence.

“The Government deeply regrets that a man was convicted and executed in circumstances now found to be unsafe. All that can be done now by way of remedy is to clear his name of the conviction, which this pardon will do, in the hope that this will be a proper tribute to his memory,” said a statement from the Department of Justice.

“Equally the Government regrets that this decision leaves unresolved the brutal murder of Ms Mary McCarthy, whose children were deprived of their mother in terrible circumstances.”

The Government expressed sympathy with both families.

“They’ve waited a long time,” said David Langwallner, director of the Irish Innocence Project, an organisation that provides free legal services to people wrongfully convicted of crimes.

The project submitted its case for a posthumous pardon, which included new evidence, to the Department of Justice in 2013.

Langwallner said the pardon is conclusive acknowledgement that, not only was the evidence insufficient, but that Mr Gleeson was innocent.

Grand-nephew Kevin Gleeson said it was an emotional day for his family.

“It’s great to see that, once and for all, the good name of Harry Gleeson has finally been restored. His innocence is no longer an issue and can never be questioned again.

“It’s been a burden and a shadow over our family for the last 74 years. The announcement today goes somewhat to remove that burden and shadow off us.”

Bernadette Gorman, whose father Billy lived and worked with Mr Gleeson, said of the trial: “[My father] was a crucial witness, and he was silenced … He never really got over it.”

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