Innocence March: Recognizing the Wrongfully Convicted

On March 24, 2018, more than five hundred men and women marched through Memphis Tennessee.  Most of them had spent a large part of their lives in prison– a combined 3,501 years among them– for crimes they did not commit.

The march was the closing event for the 2018 Innocence Network conference, a gathering of exonorees and lawyers working on behalf of those wrongfully convicted.  Exonorees came from every state in the country and from countries across the globe. They marched with attorneys and advocates and family. They held signs demanding change in the system that had wronged them.  Demanding accountability. Demanding, at least, public recognition that innocent men and women were being arrested and convicted by agents acting on the public’s behalf.

Just days before the march, the National Registry of Exonerations at the University of Michigan released a review of the 139 people exonerated in 2017.  Of them, well over half were initially convicted as the result of official misconduct, such as officers threatening witnesses, lab analysts falsifying results, or exculpatory information being withheld at trial. This misconduct is statistically more likely to occur in Reading more here

One response to “Innocence March: Recognizing the Wrongfully Convicted

  1. I wonder if some of the marchers were descendants of wrongly convicted people? Maybe even descendants of cases I have read about?

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